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Southport Lanes Bowling Alley Going Out Of Business After 98 Years Due To COVID-19 – CBS Chicago

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CHICAGO (CBS) — The Southport Lanes bowling alley and its predecessor, the Nook, survived the Great Depression, the Spanish Flu, and some of Chicago’s worst weather – but not COVID-19.

The virus has wiped out yet another well-known Chicago business.

As CBS 2’s Marissa Parra reported Thursday, stepping into Southport Lanes, 3325 N. Southport Ave., is like stepping back in time. It’s a place where people, not machines, set the pins – and it’s one of the few places left in the country where that happens.

“So here’s the bowling lanes that have been around since 1920,” Southport Lanes general manager Phil Carneol said as he displayed the vintage setup.

From bartender to general manager, Carneol has spent more time at Southport Lanes than he has at home.

“I started bartending here when I was a snotty-nosed kid in 1991,” Carneol said.

The building was built in 1900 by Schlitz Brewery and was originally named the Nook. It was renamed Southport Lanes in 1922, when the 98-year history that is now ending began.

And if the walls could talk, you probably wouldn’t want to know what they’d say.

“This was an old speakeasy, where supposedly, there was a den of ill repute upstairs,” Carneol said. “Supposedly, there was gambling in the back.”

Southport Lanes’ website notes that there is still a dumbwaiter that was once used to bring refreshments to the escorts at the brothel upstairs and their clients. There is also a legend that Mayor Anton Cermak once held a weekly poker game in one of the secret rooms.

After prohibition, a new addition was built east of the bar room. It originally housed a gambling facility with ties to racetracks round the country. As the website put it, “In essence, it was an illegal off track betting parlor.”

But those same walls that survived Prohibition, the 1918 flu, and world wars will not survive COVID-19.

“I was waiting for the phone call,” Carneol said, “and I see the numbers.”

According to a study by Yelp, this is part of a national trend. From the beginning of March through the end of August, Chicago businesses have seen nearly 2,000 temporary closures and more than 3,000 permanent closures.

“We started having to sanitize bowling balls and pool sticks,” Carneol said.

Tedious tasks, expensive cleaning, and less room for paying diners means Southport Lanes can’t make ends meet.

“You’re just not making any money,” Carneol said. “The concern I have is there’s a lot of people who are going to be out of work.”

And for the place that has served the North Side of Chicago for almost a century, Carneol said it is like getting ready to hug an old friend for the last time.

“I’m going to miss the drips on Lane 4, you know?” he said. “It’s like you know your own kid, you know? It’s like you know your own family member.”

Southport Lanes opened for the evening as usual on Thursday, but you have a week and a half to say your goodbyes.

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Business owner says sign is not racist

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“It’s kind of sad that people go to these extents to read into stuff and twist and turn a question. [It’s] not a racist question. I am not a racist,” Mike told WTRF, adding that he has Black customers and deliverymen. “The racist stuff is just somebody twisting and turning, and it’s ridiculous. Everything right now is very high tension, and this might be some of it, some way that people try to let the steam go.”

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SpaceX is rapidly growing its Internet satellite business

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With an eventual public offering in mind, SpaceX is ramping up its Starlink Internet service, as it’s slated to launch another 60 satellites on Wednesday.

The launch, according to a list from the Federal Aviation Administration, is slated to happen from Cape Canaveral, Fla. It will take place at 12:36 p.m. EDT on the company’s Falcon 9 rocket, according to SpaceflightNow.com.

On Sunday, SpaceX launched another group of 60 satellites, which the Hawthorne, Calif.-based company said will provide “high-speed broadband Internet to locations where access has been unreliable, expensive or completely unavailable.”

MUSK’S SPACEX WINS PENTAGON AWARD FOR MISSING-TRACKING SATELLITES

More than 700 satellites have been launched, according to CNet, which also notes that 60 of the older satellites are in the process of deorbiting

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SpaceX continues to bolster its service ahead of its public launch, scheduled for later this year. On Monday, SpaceX teamed with Microsoft to use its Azure cloud computing service to help connect and deploy new services for its Starlink unit.

The Musk-led company has said it is targeting service in the northern part of the U.S. and Canada this year, but has not given an exact time frame yet.

In the past, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has said that the company will “probably” take its Starlink Internet business public, but only when it has “predictable” and “smooth” revenue growth.

MICROSOFT TEAMS WITH ELON MUSK’S SPACEX TO PUSH CLOUD BATTLE WITH AMAZON INTO ORBIT

In October 2019, Musk sent a tweet using the Starlink satellite system.

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In April, Musk said there were 420 Starlink satellites in space.

In July, Morgan Stanley said SpaceX could be worth as much as $175 billion if Musk’s Starlink Internet service is successful.

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Kilani Bakery in business 61 years turns to social media to bring in customers

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WAHIAWA, (KHON2) — To survive the pandemic, small businesses have had to adapt to the ever-changing COVID-19 guidelines. Many long-time local businesses have also had to find new creative ways to bring in customers amid the pandemic.

[Hawaii news on the go–LISTEN to KHON 2GO weekday mornings at 7:30 a.m.]

One of those businesses is Kilani Bakery, a Wahiawa gem that has been serving the community for 61 years.

The bakery is old school. It first opened in 1959 on Kilani Avenue in Wahiawa.

“We literally have the best customers, and it’s because of them that we keep going,” said Dawn Takara, the manager of the bakery.

Sidney Takara’s father started the tiny, humble bakery.

“I worked in the bakery washing dishes, doing little things I picked up here and there,” said Sidney Takara about his childhood.

Eventually, the bakery expanded to its current location at 704 Kilani Ave., and Sidney Takara and his brother Jeffrey took over the business.

Dawn Takara said the bakery is hard work.

“My husband and my son, they start at about six in the evening and then they go from there, and then another baker comes in about one o’clock [in the morning],” she explained.

Sidney Takara said working through the night is worth it for his community.

“I meet people at the bank like on a weekend, the teller and is there and says, ‘Oh yeah, I used to go there after high school,’” Sidney Takara said.

Kilani Bakery is known for its irresistible brownies that often sell out.

“It’s a little chewy. We have nuts in it,” Dawn Takara explained about the brownies. “[Customers] call it crack brownies,” she said.

However, the pandemic has been a difficult time for many businesses.

Sales at the bakery are down, so Kilani Bakery has come up with new ways to get customers.

“We’re very old school. We don’t like social media, but we’ve turned to social media to put ourselves out there and to do some advertising,” Dawn Takara explained.

On top of COVID-19, it doesn’t help that there is construction daily along Kilani Avenue.

The Takara’s said the construction deters many customers from going to the bakery.

However, for those who do want to support the long-time local business, there is plenty of parking available.

Because of COVID-19, the Takara’s said it is no longer about making money. It is simply about surviving for their customers.

“They follow us to the end,” Dawn Takara said about their loyal customers. “They threaten us if we ever even think of shutting down,” she said.

Dawn Takara said they also hope to stay in business for years to come, so their kids can one day take over.

“I always tell my kids, you have to love what you do,” Dawn Takara stated.

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