Connect with us

Health

Covid-19 Live Updates: As Cases Rise, Europe Enters ‘Living-With-the-Virus Phase’

Published

on

Hundreds of Hasidic Jewish pilgrims seeking to enter Ukraine from Belarus in defiance of virus travel restrictions were stopped by border guards on Tuesday, as Ukraine mobilized additional guards to bolster its forces.

Ukraine closed its borders last month as cases in the country ticked up, partly to halt the yearly pilgrimage to the city of Uman, the site of the grave of Rabbi Nachman, the founder of the Breslov branch of the Hasidic movement. The pilgrimage is timed to the Jewish New Year, which begins on Friday. Israeli health officials have supported Ukraine’s decision in light of the pandemic.

The pilgrims began arriving at a border crossing with Belarus on Monday afternoon, according to the Ukrainian border guard service. Authorities in Belarus let the group pass and they gathered on a road in the buffer area between the two border stations.

Through the night, hundreds of men and boys danced and sang songs. Their luggage was piled along fields on both sides of the road. The men tried to convince the border guards to let them through to celebrate the new year, the most important religious holiday for Hasidim. Little boys, looking bored and sleepy, stood by watching.

Some of the pilgrims had traveled to the Novi Yarylovychi border crossing believing it was open, which was not the case, Israel Public Broadcasting tweeted. Ukrainian authorities said the foreigners were warned about the border closure.

Ukraine’s border guard service said that 690 pilgrims had gathered along the border by Tuesday, and the agency’s director, Serhiy Deyneko, said that more were expected on charter flights arriving in Belarus. Belarusian media reported a different number of pilgrims on the border, saying about 1,500 had already arrived.

Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelensky, said that the border closure will be enforced until it expires on Sept. 28. The country has reported nearly 20,000 new virus cases over the past week, bringing the total to more than 160,000, according to a Times database.

Reporting was contributed by Sarah Almukhtar, Matt Apuzzo, Emma Bubola, Emily Cochrane, Shaila Dewan, Nicholas Fandos, Antonella Francini, Rick Gladstone, Jennifer Jett, Anemona Hartocollis, Eric Lipton, Salman Masood, Donald G. McNeil Jr., Constant Méheut, Claire Moses, Eshe Nelson, Norimitsu Onishi, Gaia Pianigiani, Roni Caryn Rabin, Campbell Robertson, Amanda Rosa, Christopher F. Schuetze, Michael D. Shear, Jeanna Smialek, Eileen Sullivan, Glenn Thrush, Maria Varenikova, Sui-Lee Wee, Ceylan Yeginsu and Elaine Yu.



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Health

Indiana Health Commissioner Thinks Halloween Can Happen, But with Changes – WBIW

Published

on

By

(UNDATED) – Indiana Health Commissioner Dr. Kristina Box says she thinks Halloween can happen this year in Indiana, though there will be some changes.

Indiana Health Commissioner Dr. Kristina Box

With six weeks to go, she’s clear in saying it’s still early.

She recommends not having Halloween parties with lots of kids. She says more guidance will come in the next few weeks as it’s a case by case basis depending on the state of the pandemic in each county.

“If a county’s or community’s numbers are low, I think Halloween can occur safely,” Box said. “Again, it’s about washing your hands carefully, right? It’s about not letting your kids dig into that pumpkin, that bucket, and eat it as they’re walking around.”

She also said large Halloween parties are a bad idea.

Dr. Box plans to give more advice soon.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Source link

Continue Reading

Health

How to keep kids happy and healthy while e-learning

Published

on

By

Virtual students may experience more anxiety, stress and weight gain, doctor says.

COLUMBIA, S.C. — A Columbia doctor says children that are learning from home may be experiencing more anxiety, stress and weight gain.

“Most children I’ve spoken to that are completely virtual, are struggling and not happy,”  Dr. Deborah Greenhouse said. Greenhouse is a pediatrician with Prisma Health and the Palmetto Pediatric Adolescent Clinic. She’s also a spokesperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics.

She says many students are facing physical and mental health problems due to social isolation and sitting in front of a screen all day.

RELATED: Students to begin face to face learning in Orangeburg on September 28

“We’re seeing a lot of increase in anxiety, social isolation and stress. We’re also seeing lots of kids come in with hand and wrist pain because they’re sitting at a computer all day. I had three of those [patients] this morning,” Greenhouse said.

The pediatrician says they’re also seeing at-home students gain more weight than usual because they’re sitting in front of the computer and not exercising.

RELATED: Young children frustrated and in tears over digital learning as parents try to adapt during coronavirus pandemic

“If you’re sitting in front of a screen all day, you’ve got to make sure you’re getting up, moving around, getting exercise everyday,” Greenhouse advised. Some examples she gave were going for a walk with the family, swimming or putting on some music and dancing.

RELATED: Sumter schools to reevaluate virtual learning decision

Greenhouse also said healthy eating habits and getting down a solid sleep schedule are crucial. But most importantly, she said, parents and kids should give themselves some grace: “This is the year we’re going to say, ‘it’s not going to be perfect’ and that’s okay.”



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Adirondack Health Institute’s Program Endorses Nicotine Replacement Therapy Initiative

Published

on

By

GLENS FALLS — Adirondack Health Institute’s (AHI) Clear the Air in the Southern Adirondacks (CASA) program has endorsed a nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) initiative coordinated by the NYS Smokers’ Quitline. Up to three months of free nicotine gum have been made available through the Quitline, while supplies last, for those seeking help quitting smoking or vaping. Smokers and vapers can apply by calling 1-866-NY-QUITS (1-866-697-8487) or visiting www.nysmokefree.com.

“We strongly encourage all those who hear about this offer to spread the word to family and friends who smoke or vape,” said Kelly Owens, Manager, Clear the Air in the Southern Adirondacks, Adirondack Health Institute.

In addition to the free nicotine gum, the Clear the Air in the Southern Adirondacks team shares that the NYS Smokers’ Quitline has Quit Coaches available seven days per week beginning at 9:00 a.m. “The Quitline’s Quit Coaches work with all types of traditional tobacco and vape product users by developing personalized quit plans to navigate the behavioral and psychological aspects of nicotine dependence,” explained Owens. “Health care professionals can also connect to the Quitline’s Patient Referral Program by visiting nysmokefree.com/HealthcareProviders/ReferralPrograms as a supplement to visits and follow-ups with their nicotine-dependent patients.”

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending