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CorVel’s Virtual Care Services Win 2020 Business Insurance Innovation Award Nasdaq:CRVL

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IRVINE, Calif., Sept. 15, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — CorVel Corporation (NASDAQ: CRVL) has been recognized by Business Insurance as a winner of the 2020 Innovation Awards for its Virtual Care Services. The awards program, now in its 11th year, recognizes leadership, inventiveness and ingenuity in products and services designed for risk management professionals. 

As a market leader, CorVel was the first to offer 24/7 nurse triage as a key part of patient intake. The firm has now expanded its Virtual Care Services to integrate all steps of care for the injured worker, from initial nurse triage to return to work. The program encompasses initial care, pharmacy oversight, rehabilitation and ancillary services, behavioral health, and all other related medical services. These integrated connections provide the claims professionals with a single source of real-time information as well as proactive, patient-centered treatment options and tools to improve the injured worker’s care, safety, and recovery while helping employers achieve optimal workforce health and productivity.

“We are truly honored to receive this award during such an unprecedented time,” said Michael Combs, CorVel CEO. “COVID-19 rapidly changed the way we care for injured workers and has pushed telehealth to the forefront. Our goal is to redefine how claims are managed with a focus on immediate patient intervention, robust data integration, and market-changing innovations for our partners. We are designing and implementing tools for our claim professionals that better manage the care and cost while keeping employees healthy and minimizing risk for all parties involved.” 

This year, Business Insurance received about 30% more nominations than in past years as insurers, brokers, technology firms, and others introduced numerous products and services designed to help risk managers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Entries were reviewed and scored by an independent panel of judges composed of professional risk managers.

Business Insurance will recognize winners during an online awards event on September 30th. To learn more about the 2020 Innovator awards, please click here. For more information about CorVel Corporation, please visit www.corvel.com.

About CorVel
CorVel Corporation is a national provider of industry-leading workers’ compensation solutions for employers, third-party administrators, insurance companies, and government agencies seeking to control costs and promote positive outcomes. We apply technology, intelligence, and a human touch to the risk management process so our clients can intervene early and get connected to the critical intelligence they need to proactively manage risk. With a robust technology platform at its core, our connected solution is delivered by a national team of associates who are committed to helping clients design and manage programs that meet their organization’s performance goals.

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Dubuque business helps feed those struggling due to COVID-19 pandemic

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DUBUQUE, Iowa (KCRG) – Aside from being a restaurant, staff at Convivium Urban Farmstead in Dubuque try to grow their own produce and offer cooking classes.

Logically, those classes were affected because of COVID-19.

“We had 3,000 pounds of produce that we did not know what to do with or did not have an outlet for, and we thought, ‘Why don’t we try and figure out a way to use this and give back to the community, especially during this, during COVID,” Leslie Shalabi, co-founder of Convivium, said.

And that is how the Free Take N’ Bake Casserole program was born. Every Thursday for, at least, twelve weeks, staff and volunteers will be giving out free casseroles aimed to help those who are struggling financially because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

For Natalie Roling, Convivium education and program director, the experience has been rewarding.

“People are stretched thin, maybe working double shifts,” she mentioned. “It is just helpful to not have to think about maybe this one meal.”

“We are not solving the entire problem, but we are helping in the ways that we can,” Shalabi said. “For me this is just one concrete way that I am putting my energy to try to help.”

Zandra Schonhoff was first in line Thursday to grab her free casserole. She had already stopped by last week.

“This is first on the list,” she said. “When I wake up, this is right where I am going first thing.”

For her, it is crucial to secure healthy meals. That is something she said she has struggled with during the pandemic.

“It is really hard to make sure you are eating right and with this program, I mean, I have cancer so it is absolutely perfect to make sure I am getting a good meal,” she mentioned.

Copyright 2020 KCRG. All rights reserved.

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Minneapolis Police 3rd Precinct Head To Business Owner: ‘Reinforcements Aren’t Coming Any Time Soon’ – WCCO

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MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — There’s no long-term plan, and reinforcements aren’t coming anytime soon.

That’s what the head of the Minneapolis Police Department’s 3rd Precinct said in an email to a business owner who shared that his employees are scared to go to work.

READ MORE: Temporary Minneapolis Police 3rd Precinct Plan Dropped After Negotiations With Property Owners Reach Impasse

The neighborhood block of shops near East 48th Street and Chicago Avenue has felt the impact of recent crime. Craig Paulson owns Pedego Electric Bikes.

“Couple robberies. Two, three robberies in the area, and some break-ins and a couple of crazy stunts,” Paulson said.

Surveillance video shows a group accused of robbing Chad Stamps’ wife inside her gift shop, 14 Hill, during the lunch hour earlier this month.

“So they stole our car, stole our wallet, checkbook, everything,” Stamps said.

Stamps says one of the suspects punched someone trying to help her.

There’s a window broken at Town Hall Tap. Someone opened fire inside the Pizza Hut. The employee who was there has now quit. And a car flying down the street crashed into a bus stop and business.

Russell Hrubesky lives and works nearby.

“I’m scared for my coworkers, but it’s worrisome to see people that I care about just kind of in a dangerous area,” Hrubesky said.

A nearby business relayed a similar message to the inspector of the 3rd Precinct via email. They also sharing it’s hard to find employees who want to work in the area, and they are asking for a long-term plan.

Here is the response they received from Inspector Sean McGinty:

As far as a long-term plan I don’t have one. I have lost 30% of my street officers since the end of May. Budget cuts from COVID-19 and an additional 1.5 million from the council in August we have let go 17 CSO’s and cancelled a recruit class of 29. A potential Cadet class slated for January of 2021 was also eliminated. I takes about a year to get a police Officer onto the streets with hiring, backgrounds and field training so reinforcements aren’t coming anytime soon. We are doing everything we can with what we have. I hate to see great businesses like yours and the rest of your corridor being victimized and feeling unsafe. Please let me know if you have any more questions.

“It does erode the confidence in the neighborhood of the people and being able to feel safe coming down here,” Stamps said.

The Stamps store was hit a year ago, too. They say they’re not going anywhere, but lawlessness can’t continue.

“Nothing changed before and nothing’s changed now, except that these criminals have gotten more emboldened about doing this,” Stamps said.

Pedego Electric Bikes recently added a lock and doorbell.

“To say it doesn’t make you a little bit nervous, of course it does. And nobody wants a gun drawn on them. It’s always in the back of your mind,” Paulson said.

Lt. Bob Kroll, president of the Minneapolis Police Officers Federation, gave WCCO this statement:

The Inspector gave an excellent summary. I think the only plan city leadership has is to further decimate its police department. Businesses and people will continue to flee the city. And rightfully so.

Minneapolis City Councilmember Jeremy Schroeder, whose ward covers part of the third precinct, said this:

The Minneapolis Police Department currently has a budget of more than $180,000,000. Chief Arradondo reassured the City Council and the public this week that MPD is fully staffed in terms of patrols. The inspector’s stated lack of a plan is frustrating given the severity of safety concerns and the fact that MPD today has one of the largest budgets of any City department.

Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins gave WCCO this statement:

I am deeply disturbed by the increase in violent break-in and robberies specifically in this area near 48th and Chicago, and throughout the city. Small business is the lifeblood of this community and we cannot afford to allow them to continue to suffer these losses. Inspector McGinty and his staff have made some arrests in these incidents, and will continue to do their jobs with the resources that have on hand, but we know that preventing crime has to be a part of our Continuum of Public Safety as well. That means more investments in job training and opportunities, access to safe and affordable housing and other measures to steer young people towards positive pursuits.

The message from the community: City leaders need to sort out what’s going on.

“Kick it into gear, man. You got to figure it out,” Hrubesky said.

The inspector’s email came just a day after the chief assured city council members there were enough patrol officers to respond.

Minneapolis Police told WCCO, “In these very challenging times of COVID, budget cuts and retirements, the MPD continues to evaluate and reallocate the resources that we currently have to best serve the City of Minneapolis, focusing on the core responsibilities of a police department; responding to 911 calls and investigations.”

Police also said the inspector was referencing the George Floyd memorial at East Street and Chicago Avenue when he said he didn’t have a plan. The business owner says that site wasn’t mentioned in their exchange.

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Southport Lanes Bowling Alley Going Out Of Business After 98 Years Due To COVID-19 – CBS Chicago

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CHICAGO (CBS) — The Southport Lanes bowling alley and its predecessor, the Nook, survived the Great Depression, the Spanish Flu, and some of Chicago’s worst weather – but not COVID-19.

The virus has wiped out yet another well-known Chicago business.

As CBS 2’s Marissa Parra reported Thursday, stepping into Southport Lanes, 3325 N. Southport Ave., is like stepping back in time. It’s a place where people, not machines, set the pins – and it’s one of the few places left in the country where that happens.

“So here’s the bowling lanes that have been around since 1920,” Southport Lanes general manager Phil Carneol said as he displayed the vintage setup.

From bartender to general manager, Carneol has spent more time at Southport Lanes than he has at home.

“I started bartending here when I was a snotty-nosed kid in 1991,” Carneol said.

The building was built in 1900 by Schlitz Brewery and was originally named the Nook. It was renamed Southport Lanes in 1922, when the 98-year history that is now ending began.

And if the walls could talk, you probably wouldn’t want to know what they’d say.

“This was an old speakeasy, where supposedly, there was a den of ill repute upstairs,” Carneol said. “Supposedly, there was gambling in the back.”

Southport Lanes’ website notes that there is still a dumbwaiter that was once used to bring refreshments to the escorts at the brothel upstairs and their clients. There is also a legend that Mayor Anton Cermak once held a weekly poker game in one of the secret rooms.

After prohibition, a new addition was built east of the bar room. It originally housed a gambling facility with ties to racetracks round the country. As the website put it, “In essence, it was an illegal off track betting parlor.”

But those same walls that survived Prohibition, the 1918 flu, and world wars will not survive COVID-19.

“I was waiting for the phone call,” Carneol said, “and I see the numbers.”

According to a study by Yelp, this is part of a national trend. From the beginning of March through the end of August, Chicago businesses have seen nearly 2,000 temporary closures and more than 3,000 permanent closures.

“We started having to sanitize bowling balls and pool sticks,” Carneol said.

Tedious tasks, expensive cleaning, and less room for paying diners means Southport Lanes can’t make ends meet.

“You’re just not making any money,” Carneol said. “The concern I have is there’s a lot of people who are going to be out of work.”

And for the place that has served the North Side of Chicago for almost a century, Carneol said it is like getting ready to hug an old friend for the last time.

“I’m going to miss the drips on Lane 4, you know?” he said. “It’s like you know your own kid, you know? It’s like you know your own family member.”

Southport Lanes opened for the evening as usual on Thursday, but you have a week and a half to say your goodbyes.

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